Buzz! Buzz! Standing in a Swarm of 60,000 Bees

Buzz! Buzz! Buzz!The sound of 60,000 swarming bees was loud in my ears and the hair on my arms was beginning to stand on end. I slowly took a couple of steps back, making sure not to make any harsh or quick movements. Jake had told me that the honeybees wouldn’t sting if I didn’t do anything to make them feel threatened. Since I am allergic to wasps, I was naturally afraid of these small insects flying around me in the air (their bites/stings are not the same). However, I quickly gained confidence and my fear melted away; the bees were friendly. Continue reading

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Exciting! Our Produce is at the Local, Natural Grocery Store!

There’s nothing more exciting than producing something great and being able to sell it in a legitimate business location. As outdoor enthusiasts who like to shop locally and patron businesses with a strong connection to the local community, we like to visit places like the Moscow Co-Op. What’s even more exciting is they have been buying produce from our farm to sell in their store! Continue reading

Carrot Love: Importance of Seed Spacing

Nature is amazing! As a gardener and farmer, I know how important it is to pay attention to the depths and spacing of plants when you lay seeds into the ground to ensure you are growing a stable, strong and successful crop. Sometimes, seeds slip through the cracks and accidentally get planted too close together. Instead of withering and dying, you’re left with a unique plant that has some strange characteristics. Continue reading

Harvested Maple Sap: How to Make Maple Syrup

Once you’ve become a pro at harvesting your own maple sap, you can start cooking! You’ll need 40 gallons of sap to make one gallon of syrup. One tap will produce around 20 gallons of sap. Once you’ve harvested enough sap to make the final product, get the sap ready to boil. Never boil sap inside as the sticky moisture created will stick to everything inside of your house. Continue reading

Caring for Your Garden Tools

It’s about time to get outside and start working in the garden! As we dig out our weather-beaten garden tools, it becomes obvious that we may not have taken very good care while putting them away last fall.  There may be some old mud chunks left on a shovel, or maybe our pruners just don’t close as freely as they used too.  Taking proper care of your garden tools will reduce the time and frustration you put into your growing area. Continue reading