Lucky You! Wild, Edible Clovers Are Abundant

Looking for a 4-leaf clover in honor of St. Patrick’s Day? Why stop there? You can make clover foraging part of your array of wild edibles and search all year long.

Speaking as someone who has a knack for finding 4-leaf clovers and sometimes even 5, 6, or 7-leafed ones, the more time you spend in clover fields, the more likely you’ll find a 4-leafed one. Foraging for wild clover is a great way to get outside and get lucky in your search for free wild food. Continue reading

Harvested Maple Sap: How to Make Maple Syrup

Once you’ve become a pro at harvesting your own maple sap, you can start cooking! You’ll need 40 gallons of sap to make one gallon of syrup. One tap will produce around 20 gallons of sap. Once you’ve harvested enough sap to make the final product, get the sap ready to boil. Never boil sap inside as the sticky moisture created will stick to everything inside of your house. Continue reading

Edible Field Garlic

All across the country, wild and edible field garlic pops up in small green tufts. It’s hearty, resilient and easy to identify. It’s edible right out of the ground, but you can clean it, cook it or add it to soups and salads. Field garlic is not native to North America and in a few states it’s an invasive species that flavors cow’s milk in an unappetizing way. Eating this free resource is good for your local environment! Continue reading